“Very happy about very positive approach and about enthusiasm of Gwyn (great role model!) super materials!”

Ideas shared by Positive Eye

 

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World Book Day 3rd March: Fun with ‘Oi Frog’

‘Oi Frog’ is written by Kes Gray and Jim Field and is published by Hodder Children’s Books

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Oi-Frog-Kes-Gray/dp/1444910868

A wonderfully funny rhyming story about a frog who talks to a cat about what animals sit on – but the frog doesn’t want to sit on a log!

The illustrations are colourful and the animals are captured in a lively way throughout the book. Here are some ideas and suggestions to make the book accessible to children who use tactile methods to enjoy literacy.

Recently I had the opportunity to read this story to a group of children who were both sighted and visually impaired, they all had so much fun feeling the animals and guessing what they sat on!

Extending the learning

  1. Read the story and encourage the child to hold the animals and objects whilst they listen. Have fun guessing what each animal might be sitting on!
  2. Listen to a recording of each animal/bird noise, guess the sound each animal/bird makes
  3. Categorise the animals and birds, e.g. jungle, woodland
  4. Categorise each animal/bird’s habitat
  5. Make a map of the world and plot where the animals/birds live
  6. Make up a story about each animal or bird around the object they are sitting on.
  7. Make a word book beginning with the initial letter of the child’s favourite animal/bird from the story.
  8. Categorise the objects the animals/birds sit on, by texture, shape, initial letter sounds. Explore the qualities of the objects and work on extending the concept of each, e.g. ‘cakeness of cake,’ boxness of box.’
  9. Encourage the child to place the animals/birds in the order that they are introduced in the story.
  10. Encourage the child to place the correct object with each animal/bird before you read the story to them.
  11. Visit the zoo or animal centre in your local area and stroke some of the animals from the book!

Download the resource ideas sheet 

 

 

 

Frozen Literacy Resource

Creating a holistic approach based on a theme or story enables children who are visually impaired to access and enjoy literacy and numeracy activities in a meaningful way.

The film ‘Frozen’ has been tremendously popular with many children. The following are accessible, creative, fun ideas and suggestions to bring the story alive and to make it meaningful for children with visual impairments. The ideas offer a starting point and can all be adapted to suit the individual visual needs of the child you are working with.

Download the full resource sheet here

Watch the video clips on YouTube about the……

Frozen Story Bucket

Frozen Character Naming Game

Frozen Olaf Counting Game

Water cycle idea

Watercycle idea shared by a Teacher of VI from Samuel Cody School, UK

I’ve added a pic of a 3D model I made of the water cycle as well. Rocks were made from cat litter mixed with PVA and brown paint – river on the mountain is overlaid with PVA so you can feel it – clouds were quilting filler – and there’s a plastic tray to put water in.

Rows and columns and coordinates

Shared by a Teacher of VI from Samuel Cody School, UK.

The IKEA scarf hanger is great for co-ordinates in Maths! The learner just has to count how many circles along and how many up.

My blind pupil can’t make sense of RNIB grid paper – where there are the raised lines and empty squares between them, so I used one of the B&Q tiles as a “negative” and she found it much easier to count/feel the squares. I labelled the rows & columns with braille numbers.

Visual Impairment – An information pack

This pack has been written by a dedicated teaching assistant who works with children with visual impairment. She wrote it to help teaching staff understand and know how to include their needs in the mainstream setting.

Thanks to the teaching assistant from the NW of the UK for sharing this excellent resource

Wall Panel – fabulous creative idea shared with Positive Eye by a teacher of VI

Here is a fabulous idea for a Tactile Wall Panel generously shared with Positive Eye by a teacher of VI from Samuel Cody Specialist Sports College in the UK
Tactile wall. Click on image to enlarge
Tactile wall. Click on image to enlarge

Each panel is a square of mdf, mounted on another piece as a backboard that then slots into the frame that the caretaker kindly put on the wall. Each panel slots into the runners at the top and bottom. I can swap the order round or, as and when I make some more, swap new ones for old. 

The mouse in the “skirting board” (below) came from the pet aisle in Sainsbury’s – I added a squeaker. The socket is fake!

 The jeans (below) came from Primark children’s dept – £2. We hide different things in the pockets for our youngsters to find. The clothes pegs aren’t fixed so children can play with them as well.

 The flower and sea ones both have a bit of quilt wadding behind the fabric to make them easier to feel. The soil for the flower is a bit of towelling. The roots of the plant were a lucky find – a bit of cushion trim that you could unravel into strands that were themselves just string with thread bound round them.

The flower and sea panels (above) both have a bit of quilt wadding behind the fabric to make them easier to feel. The soil for the flower is a small section of towelling.

The concentric circles (below) have got various tactile things in the furrows in-between – pompoms, ric-rac, necklaces, PVA with sand in, etc.Our Design Technology teacher cut the shapes out of mdf on a laser cutter so I used the cut-out bits to make a negative version of the original.

 

Number line resource with tactile numbers and bump on markers

Bump ones used to help the child to count

Bump ones used to help the child to count

Number line resource shared by a teacher of VI from  Samuel Cody Specialist Sports College UK

Colour-coded number lines with added braille and bumpons.

The tens numbers have got a large bumpon – the rest are small ones.

The bump ons are used as markers to count along the number line.

Everyone in the class can use the same ones.

Understanding the concept of the Thermometer

Understanding the concept of theThermometer

A brilliant and very simple idea shared with Positive Eye by a creative Teacher of VI from Samuel Cody Specialist Sports College. This is an ingenious idea to teach the concept of how a thermometer works

The thermometer is made from a yellow bead threaded onto a length of dowel, mounted on a board that is painted.

The red/blue bead at each end of the dowel is a square wooden bead, drilled through to screw everything in place.

The numbers are mounted on a strip of fridge magnet so that you change them to suit your topic. For example, you could make the scale go from 0 to100, -10 to +10, use decimals etc.

 

Resource to support understanding of Cubarithms

Idea to support understanding of using Cubarithms

This is an idea shared with Positive Eye by a teacher of VI from Samuel Cody Specialist Sports College (UK) who took an idea seen at a Positive Eye course for a number square made with a glass tile and made an equivalent of a cubarithm for a braillist who can’t yet accept the idea of cubarithm numbers because they don’t have a number sign in front of them.

Making the cubarithm

You need:

I mosaic tile (B&Q) http://www.diy.com/search/results/page=4?question=Mosaic+tiles&pageSize=12

Sticky back plastic to make Braille numbers

Fridge magnet or magnetic strip

Oven tray

The tiles are glued to a net back making it possible to cut out tiles individually or in twos. Sticky label sheets (RNIB) were used to stick a number on each tile – as only 3 cells fit on a tile, to make hundreds two tiles were left stuck together. Add/subtract/equals signs can also be made to enable the child to build their own sum. The tiles can also be used to make fractions.

A small piece of fridge magnet on the back of each tile enables the child to position on a magnetic board.

The squares are kept arranged as a hundred square on a baking tray for ease of use – and they are coloured-coded (plus the colours match up to number bonds (ie: teens and nineties are red, 20s and 80s are green). Numbers can also be added on in print to be used inclusively by braillists and print readers.

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